Volume: 16.2
Year: 2001

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:
Year 2014 Volume 29 Number 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 Number 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 3
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Year 2007 Volume 22 Number 3
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Year 2006 Volume 21 Number 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 Number 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 Number 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 Number 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 Number 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 Number 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 Number 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 Number 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 Number 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 Number 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 Number 1
Year 2 Volume 28 Number 2013

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
TEACHER AND STUDENT PACING IN PROGRAMMED READING: EFFECTS FOR STUDENTS WITH BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 2001 16 2 30 KB
T. F. McLaughlin
Gonzaga University
R. P. Reid
Stanwood School District No. 401

The effects of two pacing contingencies on the reading performance of nine elementary students with behavior disorders were examined. Teacher pacing involved requiring students to complete a specified amount (14 pages) of programmed reading each day. Self-pacing was defined as students being allowed to complete as many pages as they wished during the one hour reading period. Comparisons between the two pacing contingencies were evaluated with a combination multiple baseline and ABABA single case replication experimental design. Data were gathered on both the accuracy of performance and the number of pages completed. The findings indicated that students completed more pages when teacher pacing was in effect than during student self-pacing. Accuracy of performance was high and not affected by either experimental manipulation. ... [more]


CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENT DEPRESSION: A REVIEW WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATORS 2001 16 2 74 KB
Katie Rice
T. F. McLaughlin

Gonzaga University

Depression can be defined as a syndrome of abnormally dejected mood, persistent over time that interferes with daily functioning (Coleman p.116, 1986). The current belief on childhood and adolescent depression is that children exhibit depressive symptoms paralleling those in adults. Teachers of behavior disordered students will undoubtedly encounter depressed students and should be aware that depression may significantly affect the way these students function in their daily activities. This paper defines depression and examines diagnosis, characteristics and symptoms, etiology and development, assessment procedures, and treatment teachers, parents, and clinicians can use when working with depressed children and adolescents. ... [more]


PEER TUTORING AND SOCIAL BEHAVIORS: A REVIEW 2001 16 2 59 KB
Barbara J. Bolich
Gonzaga University

Children with disabilities often need social skill interventions. Regular classrooms rarely provide training or maintenance programs for social skills to meet the needs of children who are mainstreamed. Educators who work with these children need effective and easily implemented interventions that provide increased practice and opportunities to participate in social interactions with typical peers. Peer tutoring interventions were examined as a means of increasing appropriate social behavior in the classroom. Peer tutoring studies have taken various forms (e.g., cross-age, classwide, reciprocal) and evaluated many different aspects of social behavior. This paper examines such studies and proposes guidelines for future peer tutoring programs. Such guides should improve our knowledge of effective tutoring programs, and their effects on the social behavior of children with disabilities. ... [more]


THE USE OF MNEMONIC STRATEGIES AS INSTRUCTIONAL TOOLS FOR CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES 2001 16 2 42 KB
Barbara Bolich
T. F. McLaughlin

Gonzaga University

The present paper reviews and examines the use of mnemonic strategies as an instructional procedure to assist children with learning disabilities. The available literature indicated that teachers who employ such strategies assist their students on a variety of academic measures. Difficulties with employing mnemonic strategies were outlined. Further research evaluating mnemonic strategies in classrooms which more approximate those found in today's schools was recommended. ... [more]


PARENT LIFE MANAGEMENT AND TRANSFORMATIONAL OUTCOMES WHEN A CHILD HAS DOWN SYNDROME 2001 16 2 48 KB
K. Scorgie
Azusa Pacific University
L. Wilgosh,
D. Sobsey,
J. McDonald

University of Alberta

Our research examines three aspects of effective life management in parents of children with disabilities: strategies parents find helpful for effectively managing life, personal qualities that parents consider important to effective life management, and parent transformational outcomes on personal, relational and perspectival dimensions. This paper extends the data analysis to the results for two subgroups of families which have a child with Down syndrome, from two larger questionnaire studies (Scorgie, Wilgosh, & McDonald, 1997; Wilgosh, Scorgie, & Fleming, 2000). The purpose was to examine effective life management for these families, a sufficiently large and identifiable subgroup in each of the two surveys, to allow examination of consistency of findings for these families compared to the broader family data. The findings indicated similar dimensions of life management for such families, and important transformational outcomes, all of which have implications for parents of children with Down syndrome and the professionals with whom they interact. ... [more]


INSTRUMENTAL ENRICHMENT AS A VEHICLE FOR TEACHERS IN IMPLEMENTING OUTCOMES BASED EDUCATION IN SOUTH AFRICA 2001 16 2 87 KB
Mervyn Skuy
Sandra Young
Achmat Ajam
Peter Fridjhon

University of the Witwatersrand
Lilian Lomofsky
University of the Western Cape

The new political dispensation in South Africa has replaced the content-oriented, rote-learning based curriculum of the previous regime with an Outcomes Based Education (OBE) approach. OBE is compatible with the developments in cognitive education in general, and with Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment (IE) thinking skills programme in particular. Accordingly, this study investigated the effectiveness of involving teachers in an IE programme in improving their ability to implement OBE in their schools. Eighteen teachers from four schools catering for historically disadvantaged black students participated in the programme over a period of eighteen months (58 school weeks). Teachers were trained in the application of the IE programme itself, and in the infusion of its cognitive principles and strategies in their subject content and goals. Findings suggested the usefulness of an IE-based programme in providing teachers with the appropriate attitudes and skills for implementing the Outcomes Based Education approach with students who have special educational needs. ... [more]


INTEGRATING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN HONG KONG SECONDARY SCHOOLS: TEACHERS’ ATTITUDES AND THEIR POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP TO GUIDANCE TRAINING 2001 16 2 139 KB
Mantak Yuen
Peter Westwood

The University of Hong Kong

At the present time, Hong Kong schools are moving gradually toward integration and inclusive education. Previous studies suggest that when students with special needs are integrated successfully in regular classrooms the success is largely dependent upon positive attitudes of the teachers. This study assessed the attitudes towards integration exhibited by teachers in a sample of typical Hong Kong secondary schools. The participants comprised of 345 teachers from 39 secondary schools. Results suggested that the teachers did not hold particularly favourable or supportive attitudes towards the policy of integration. While the majority supported the underlying principle that it is every child’s right to learn in a regular classroom, most were uncertain about the actual practicalities of such placement. In particular, negative attitudes were expressed concerning the feasibility of integrating students with behavioural problems, and those with severe visual or hearing difficulties or with mental handicaps. More positive attitudes were expressed towards integrating students with physical disabilities and those with mild health or speech problems. When teachers with guidance training were compared with those without it, the results showed that teachers with guidance training generally held more positive attitudes towards integration. ... [more]