Volume: 19.2
Year: 2004

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1. Select articles from one of the following issues:
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Year 2 Volume 28 Number 2013

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
THOUGHTFUL STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS IN BRUNEI DARUSSALAM 2004 19 2 111 KB
Koay Teng Leong and Sim Wong Kooi
Universiti Brunei Darussalam

A recent study has provided some indication of the types of teaching strategies that Learning Assistance Teachers and Regular Teachers in Brunei Darussalam are likely to use. This paper will describe, briefly, the background, policy and teacher education initiatives towards inclusive education, as well as some relevant aspects of the study, especially in respect of the perceived teacher efficacy, instructional adaptations and collaborative roles in inclusive classrooms. In discussing future directions, it is proposed that the thoughtful teaching paradigm is applied in developing more thoughtful strategies in inclusive education. Specific examples will be presented to illustrate how some of the proposed teaching strategies could be more creative, reflective, responsible and reciprocal in order to cater to the diverse needs of students in Brunei Darussalam... [more]


EDUCATION OF STUDENTS WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS IN KENYA:TRENDS AND ISSUES 2004 19 2 55 KB
Mary W. Kiarie
Southern Connecticut State University

Until the nineteen hundreds, people with disabilities did not receive formal educational services in Kenya. This paper discusses available educational services for individuals with visual impairments in terms of their forms, materials provided, and educational placements. Areas of most progress are discussed along with obstacles that stand in the way of efficient services for this population. This paper contributes to the rather scarce literature on educational services for students with disabilities in developing countries.... [more]


ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER AND RATING SCALES WITH A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE CONNORS TEACHER RATING SCALE (1998) 2004 19 2 85 KB
Matthew Cordes and T. F. McLaughlin

Gonzaga University

This paper explores the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) definition of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) (ADHD). The use of rating scales to diagnose ADHD was evaluated. Rating scales have been used since the 1970’s and are highly influential in the detection of ADHD today. We also examined the advantages and disadvantages of using rating scales. Rating scales seem to change the percentage of individuals who meet the criteria for a diagnosis of ADHD based on different age groups, gender, and ethnicity. Finally, the Conners Teacher Rating Scale (CTRS-R) (Conners, Sitarenios, Parker, & Epstein, 1998) was reviewed. The important changes in the revision of the Conners Teacher Rating Scale-Revised ( CTRS-R) were detailed. The use of the CTRS-R is recommended as part of a multi-faceted assessment to diagnose and evaluate treatment procedures for children and adolescents with ADHD.... [more]


A STUDY ON NEEDS OF PARENTS WÝTH CHÝLDREN WÝTH HEARÝNG-IMPAÝRMENT ÝN TRANSÝTÝON TO KÝNDERGARTEN ÝN TURKEY 2004 19 2 151 KB
Tevhide Kargýn Berrin Baydýk And Gönül Akçamete

Ankara University

This study investigated the information needs of parents who have children in transition into public kindergarten. The research group consisted of 94 parents who have children with hearing impairment with ages ranging from 3 to 5. “The Scale Parental Information Needs in Transition to Kindergarten” was used in this study. Parents responses to the items of the questionnaires were determined by the means and percentages. The research also examined the effects of different variables. These variables were the age at which children began education, age and educational level of parents. The data was analyzed by Kruskall Wallis H Test. The results in this study show that parents have information needs in all items of the scale.... [more]


THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES IN ZIMBABWE 2004 19 2 62 KB
Morgan Chitiyo and John Wheeler

Tennessee Technological University

When Zimbabwe gained independence in 1980, the government started a massive expansion of the education system. Two decades later, the country’s literacy rate had risen to one of the highest in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the same cannot be said for special education. This paper examines the development of the education system in Zimbabwe with special attention given to the history of special education. This paper examines why special education has lagged behind in terms of its development in a country where the education system has developed so rapidly.... [more]


ON OUTCOMES-BASED EDUCATION AND CREATIVITY IN SOUTH AFRICA 2004 19 2 88 KB
Mursheed Fakier And Yusef Waghid

University of Stellenbosch

This article questions the potential of Outcomes-based education (OBE) in South Africa to be rational and imaginative, that is, creative. Our contention is that the notions of outcomes seems to be trapped in a technicist orientation of deciding in advance what is good and worthwhile for learners to do in education. We argue that OBE is not a sufficient justification of what education means, thus impeding the very act of creative reconstructions of knowledge... [more]


THE EFFECT OF AN ADAPTED SWIMMING PROGRAM ON THE PERFORMANCE OF AN INDIVIDUAL WITH KYPHOSIS – SCOLIOSIS. 2004 19 2 74 KB
Voutsas Dimitrios and Kokaridas Dimitrios

University of Thessaly

The purpose of this action research study was to examine the effect of an adapted swimming program in terms of improving the performance and behaviour of an individual with kyphosis-scoliosis, with the use of an individualised education approach. The sample consisted of an adult woman with kyphosis-scoliosis. The pre-swimming phase included a holistic evaluation of the abilities of the individual in terms of swimming performance, measurement of the behaviour according to the Rutter Scale and physical – health variables. Next, the subject followed an adapted swimming program based on the Halliwick Method. The duration of the swimming program was 6 months at a frequency of two times per week, for 60 minutes. Each session included additional muscle strength and body posture exercises outside water. At the end of the swimming program the initial measurements were repeated. The results of the study revealed the beneficial effect of the swimming lessons in terms of improving the swimming abilities and the behaviour of the individual. In the light of the findings, useful conclusions were drawn regarding the structure of the swimming program.... [more]


MOTHERS’ JUDGMENTS OF STUDENTS WITH EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE AND SOCIAL MALADJUSTMENT/CONDUCT DISORDER: COMPARISONS OF TARGET STUDENTS AND SIBLINGS 2004 19 2 140 KB
Ray C. Easler, Jr. and Frederic J. Medway
University of South Carolina

In response to United States special education law requirements, this study attempted to differentiate emotionally disturbed and socially maladjusted students using parent ratings on the FACES III and a newly developed interview measure of primarily internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Forty mothers of students in special education and 40 mothers of students in court schools rated the target student and a close in age sibling. Data showed differences in family typology between the groups. Mothers rated socially maladjusted students similar to siblings but did not rate emotionally disturbed youth similar to siblings. Study results also indicated the importance of peer influence and age of problem onset for multidisciplinary teams to consider in evaluations of emotional disturbance.... [more]


TEACHERS COPING WITH CHANGES: INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN MAINSTREAM CLASSES: AN INTERNATIONAL VIEW 2004 19 2 172 KB
Tali Heiman
The Open University of Israel

The study was designed to examine and compare British and Israeli teachers' perceptions, expectations, and needs regarding the inclusion process. In both countries, the inclusion movements support the rights of children to have their special educational needs identified and met through education legislation and the right of individuals with disabilities to equal opportunities. The sample consisted of 116 Israeli teachers and 140 British teachers in mainstream classes. The teachers' questionnaire consisted of seven open-ended questions dealing with the theoretical concept of inclusion, the advantages and disadvantages of the ideal model of inclusion, and indicators of the teachers’ current situation in their classrooms. The results pointed to similarities and differences in the teachers' assessments of the factors that facilitate and hamper the inclusion process. While British teachers focused on non-disabled students, teachers and the educational system as facilitating inclusion, Israeli teachers emphasized the role of included students and of teachers, as those who impede the process. Most teachers in both countries preferred that students receive academic support outside of their classrooms. British teachers emphasized the advantages of inclusion for the entire class, and disadvantages to the students with LD; Israeli teachers focused on advantages to teachers and noted more disadvantages for non-disabled students and for teachers. These findings suggest that although the teachers evaluated the inclusion process in different ways and tended to implement... [more]


ATTITUDES OF GREEK PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS TOWARD INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITES 2004 19 2 75 KB
Dionisia Papadopoulou, Dimitrios Kokaridas, Zisis Papanikolaou and Asterios Patsiaouras.

University of Thessaly

The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of Greek physical education teachers toward the inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education settings and to compare the results with the findings of similar studies. The sample consisted of 93 participants, all physical education teachers working at different schools of Athens. Each subject completed the Teacher Integration Attitudes Questionnaire (Sideridis and Chandler, 1997), which assesses scores for four factors: skills, benefits, acceptance and support. The results of the study showed that the attitudes of physical education teachers toward the inclusion of students with disabilities in their regular classes are related to the level of knowledge that the teachers believe they have for the special needs conditions; in addition, they doubt that inclusion could be workable, due to the lack of appropriate support services. In the light of the findings, the concept of inclusion was further analysed.... [more]