Volume: 27.1
Year: 2012

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:
Year 2014 Volume 29 Number 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 Number 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 Number 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 Number 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 Number 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 Number 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 Number 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 Number 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 Number 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 Number 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 Number 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 Number 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 Number 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 Number 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 Number 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 Number 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 Number 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 Number 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 Number 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 Number 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 Number 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 Number 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 Number 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 Number 1
Year 2 Volume 28 Number 2013

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
A REVIEW OF CO-MORBID DISORDERS OF ASPERGER'S DISORDER AND THE TRANSITION TO ADULTHOOD 2012 27 1 67 KB
Stephanie Robinson
Tracey Curwen
Thomas G. Ryan

Nipissing University

This review includes empirical peer-reviewed articles which support the examination of Asperger’s Disorder and co-morbid disorders, as well as an analysis of how adolescents with Asperger’s Disorder transition to adulthood. Although the focus was on Asperger’s Disorder, some studies include Autism Spectrum Disorder samples. It was found that people with Asperger’s Disorder generally experience more anxiety than control groups. Rates of non-verbal learning disabilities did not differ significantly from control groups, however it remained unknown if rates of specific learning disabilities differ. The transition to adulthood focused on education, employment, living arrangements, and relationships. The findings revealed that people with Asperger’s may have more difficulty in the transition to adulthood, however they were capable of achieving high educational levels, employment, independent living, and successful relationships. It was suggested that anxiety treatments and social skills training be further incorporated into counselling programs, and that future research examine gender differences in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of Asperger’s Disorder. ... [more]


ACADEMIC SUPPORTS, COGNITIVE DISABILITY AND MATHEMATCS ACHIEVEMENT FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED YOUTH: A MULTILEVEL MODELING APPROACH 2012 27 1 145 KB
J. Martin Giesen
Brenda S. Cavenaugh
Michele Capella McDonnall

Mississippi State University

Elementary and middle school students who are blind or visually impaired (VI) lag up to three years behind non-disabled peers in mathematics achievement. We investigated the impact of academic supports in the school on mathematics achievement, controlling grade, gender, cognitive disability, and family SES. Data were from SEELS (Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study) that followed a national sample of students over six years. Analyses employed multilevel modeling. We found the extent of academic supports in the school was positively related to mathematics achievement for visually impaired (VI ) students without cognitive disability but not for those with cognitive disability. Gender and socio-economic status (SES) had no effects. Achievement growth was not hampered by cognitive disability. Schools with more academic supports may enhance mathematics learning for VI students without a cognitive disability, and VI students with a cognitive disability may need both a high level of supports and specialized supports to facilitate mathematics achievement. Keywords: mathematics achievement, blind, visually impaired, academic supports, cognitive disability.... [more]


ATTITUDES, SENTIMENTS, AND CONCERNS OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS AFTER THEIR INCLUDED EXPERIENCE 2012 27 1 59 KB
Bruce A. Golmic
Mary A. Hansen

Robert Morris University

In order for educators to effectively include more students with exceptional learning needs in general education classrooms, the international community of educators must overcome barriers toward inclusion including existing attitudes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an INCLUDED Experience on the attitudes, sentiments and concerns of pre-service teachers toward students with exceptional learning needs after 12 weeks of student teaching in secondary education classrooms. The INCLUDED Experience is an eight step performance based reflective child study of pre-service teachers’ attitude, concerns, knowledge, and skills during their inclusion in the classroom. The sample consisted of 85 education majors seeking secondary teaching certification across the content areas. Results provided evidence that after completing an INCLUDED Experience, pre-service teachers had positive attitudes and decreased concerns toward inclusion. The overall findings suggest that the INCLUDED Experience shows promise as a model that pre-service teachers should follow to support, teach and engage students with exceptional learning needs in general education classrooms. ... [more]


BOOK REVIEW - MAKING ONLINE TEACHING ACCESSIBLE: NORMAN COOMBS 2012 27 1 22 KB
Fiona S. Baker

... [more]


BOOK REVIEW - POWERFUL PRACTICES FOR HIGH-PERFORMING SPECIAL EDUCATORS: ROBERTA KAUFMAN AND ROBERT WANDBERG 2012 27 1 21 KB
Fiona S. Baker

... [more]


CRITICAL COMPONENTS OF SUCCESSFUL INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES: LITERATURE REVIEW 2012 27 1 184 KB
Turki Alquraini
King Saud University
Dianne Gut
Ohio Univerisity

This paper examines the critical components of successful inclusion for students with severe disabilities. This review sets out to provide an overview of literature regarding effective practices for inclusion with a focus on critical components of successful inclusion that assist in preparing the stakeholders worldwide to work and engage effectively with students with disabilities in inclusive schools. The methodology used to conduct this review was to systematically search internet resources, abstracts and databases. The descriptors used include: students with severe disabilities/significant disabilities/ intellectual disabilities, inclusion, modification, adaptations, assistive technology, collaboration, instructional strategies, typically developing peers, and family support. This was followed by the application of two sets of criteria: (1) the article consists of subjects with inclusion/inclusive/general education setting/public schools and (2) the article examines critical components of successful inclusion of students with disabilities or equivalent concepts as the outcome. Seventy two studies met the two criteria and are presented in this review. The author provides an integrated overview of current knowledge regarding the critical components that enhance the quality of inclusive education programs for students with severe disabilities across the world. This review provides evidence that these components support students’ access and progress, either in curricular or non-curricular activities in general education settings. Finally, the author identifies the need for future empirical studies to further examine how each of these components supports students with severe disabilities in general education settings. ... [more]


EFFECTS OF MULTISENSORY PHONICS-BASED TRAINING ON THE WORD RECOGNITION AND SPELLING SKILLS OF ADOLESCENTS WITH READING DISABILITIES 2012 27 1 72 KB
Sally Ann Geiss
Chapman University
Kenyatta O. Rivers
University of Central Florida
Kelly Kennedy
Chapman University
Linda J. Lombardino
University of Florida

The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of an Orton-Gillingham-based reading instruction system, the Barton Reading and Spelling System (BRSS; Barton 2000), that was used as a supplemental reading instruction program for increasing the lower-level reading skills of a group of adolescents with persistent reading problems. Nine students participated in the supplemental reading program based on pre-test scores of a spoken and written language assessment battery. Progress was measured at the end of intervention by post-testing students on the same assessment battery. Each student showed some improvements from their pretest to posttest scores on all of the measures utilized, with some having moderate to large effect sizes, supporting the view that the BRSS is an appropriate supplemental reading program for struggling adolescent readers within a response to instruction framework. Future research should include a larger sample size and a control group. ... [more]


MOTOR PERFORMANCE AND RHYTHMIC PERCEPTION OF CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENTAL COORDINATION DISORDER 2012 27 1 126 KB
Lefkothea Kartasidou
University of Macedonia
Panagiotis Varsamis
University of Thessaloniki
Anna Sampsonidou
Occupational Therapist, Thessaloniki, Greece

Professionals who work with children presenting intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and developmental coordination disorder (DCD) are concerned with their motor development and their rhythmic perception. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between a motor performance test and a music rhythmic test that measures performance of rhythmic perception in tactile, auditory, auditory-visual, auditory-visual-tactile sensory conditions. Participants were 19 children, ten with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and nine with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), their age ranging between 5 to 12 years. The results confirmed numerous links between motor performance scores and rhythmic perception scores. These findings are in line with previous theoretical standpoints and empirical research. However, further research is needed to determine the exact relationship between suggested motor performance factors and rhythmic perception factors. ... [more]


PERCEPTIONS OF AN EL LEARNER ON VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT 2012 27 1 144 KB
Odilea Rocha Erkaya
Eskisehir Osmangazi University
Iris S. Drower
Arizona State University

This single case study addresses an action research design (Wolcott, 1994) that utilizes observations, interviews, and documents to access what teaching and learning techniques have improved the acquisition of vocabulary of a single intermediate English language (EL) learner from Turkey. Findings are reported and discussed in terms of the student’s perceptions of vocabulary learning. The study indicates that there were gains in vocabulary knowledge and use as well as progression of strategies. In addition, findings also show that the student failed to utilize advance vocabulary strategies when he needed them the most. Implications for future studies for diversified learners are also discussed. ... [more]


RECONSTRUCTING TRANSITION KNOWLEDGE IN TAIWAN 2012 27 1 53 KB
Chen-chen Cheng
SEED Institute

Taking a post-colonial stand and using school to work transition as an example, the author re-examines the special education discourses in Taiwan and attempts to construct alternate understandings of transition from sociological and cultural perspectives. A review of past transition literature and a survey of the educational background of the special education faculty in Taiwan reveal the United States (U.S.) heritage of the special education knowledge. Although the introduction of transition concepts and models from the U.S. and the strongly U.S. influenced development of special education have contributed tremendously to the education of children with disabilities in Taiwan, the theories and philosophies that have their roots in the western history and civilization and manifested in special education theories and practices appear to go largely unnoticed by the special education scholars and practitioners in Taiwan for various reasons. In view of the continuously yet uncritically embrace and application of the borrowed theories and practices in Taiwan, the author excavates the three themes that dominate current special education and transition discourse and drive the special education practices in Taiwan. These themes include (a) the privileging of the U.S. transition knowledge, (b) the universality of transition concepts, and (c) the culture deficit approach to understanding transition in local contexts. The author then discusses the possible consequences of the contradictions and incompatibilities between borrowed transition theories and local practices, proposes alternative readings of these contradictions, and offers solutions based on Taiwan’s local social and cultural contexts.... [more]


THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CULTURALLY-BASED SOCIAL STORIES TO INCREASE APPROPRIATE BEHAVIORS OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS 2012 27 1 294 KB
Ning Hsu
Helen Hammond
Lawrence Ingalls

University of Texas at El Paso

The needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds have become a growing concern in United States. As an even greater challenge, educators are looking at effective interventions to provide appropriate education for CLD students with disabilities. The Social Story technique is a practical behavioral intervention which has been regarded as an individualized intervention since the student’s needs, background, and learning style should be taken into consideration when using this technique. This research study used an ABA design to compare the modified Social Story technique with and without culturally familiar components. Three students with exceptional needs who came from CLD backgrounds and live in this southwestern city of United States participated in this study. Findings are discussed in relation to study results, limitations, and applications for future research.... [more]


THE EFFECTS OF THE FAMILY-INVOLVED SDLMI ON ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT AND GOAL ATTAINMENT OF MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES WHO EXHIBIT PROBLEM BEHAVIOR 2012 27 1 192 KB
Nam Hee Kim
Sin-Yeon Middle School
Jiyeon Park
Ewha Womans University

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the Family-Involved Self-Determination Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) on academic engagement and goal attainment of middle school students with disabilities who exhibit problem behavior. Intervention was provided to the experimental group (12 students with their families and special educators) in Korean language classes for seven months while no treatment was provided to the control group (12 students). As a result, academic engagement in the experimental group, measured by behavior rating and direct observation, increased at a significantly higher rate than that of the control group. Also, the goal attainment of Korean language in the experimental group improved significantly compared to the control group. Finally, discussions of the results, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future studies are presented. ... [more]


THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES 2012 27 1 147 KB
Mayumi Nagano
Kansai University
Lois A. Weinberg
California State University

Japan faces an educational challenge even after the start of a new special education system (Tokubetsushienkyouiku). This article addresses the legal framework of the special education system in Japan and analyzes the issues needed to be addressed to reinforce the inclusion of children with disabilities in public regular school settings. The analysis uses published documents, including journal and newspaper articles, government notifications, government data, and court rulings, available through university library databases in Japan and the United States. Articles and court cases selected for review were those that highlighted legal issues in special education related to inclusion of children with disabilities in public regular school settings as well as the underlying philosophies of the legal decisions. Three Japanese cases involving students placement in regular schools were reviewed for comparative analysis to depict the differences in standards and underpinning philosophies in the two countries. This article argues that the U.S. special education system can provide some implications for the Japanese special education system. ... [more]


THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG COGNITIVE CORRELATES AND IRREGULAR WORD, NON-WORD, AND WORD READING 2012 27 1 73 KB
Bashir Abu-Hamour
Mu'tah University
Annmarie Urso

State University of New York at Geneseo
Nancy Mather
University of Arizona

This study explored four hypotheses: (a) the relationships among rapid automatized naming (RAN) and processing speed (PS) to irregular word, non-word, and word reading; (b) the predictive power of various RAN and PS measures, (c) the cognitive correlates that best predicted irregular word, non-word, and word reading, and (d) reading performance of typical and poor readers on irregular word, non-word, and word reading. Sixty participants in Grades 1-4 with and without reading disabilities were administered a measure of phonological awareness (PA) and a measure of working memory (WM), and several measures of RAN and PS. The findings indicated that PS had the strongest correlation with irregular word reading, whereas RAN had the strongest correlations with word reading and non-word reading. As with previous research RAN letters was the best predictor of reading skills. The best model for predicting reading was based on a combined measure of PA and RAN letters. An interesting finding was that the correlation between irregular and non-word reading was significant for students with typical reading, but insignificant for the poor readers. These findings provide support for both the dual-route and double-deficit theory of dyslexia that ascribes independent contributions of PA and RAN to the development of reading skills. ... [more]


THREE CHILDREN WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS TELL WHY PEOPLE DO RIGHT 2012 27 1 238 KB
Elizabeth L. Hardman
University of Florida

This paper presents the results of a small preliminary investigation of the moral judgment of three children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) using case study research methodology to describe their moral orientations and explore how their reasoning patterns might affect the development of a cooperative moral orientation. Data were gathered using a moral dilemma interview protocol developed specifically for the study. Results showed that all three of the children valued punishment because it defines right from wrong and coerces obedience, but they also reasoned that avoiding punishment can sometimes motivate people to do that which they know they should not. The implications of the results are discussed with respect to the overuse of punishment, the placement of children with EBD in highly restrictive special education settings, and the potential social cognitive benefits of using positive behavioral supports to include students with EBD in the classroom community.... [more]